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, but the tip of the iceberg on terms of what was on iewfer for -- offer for non-fiction. >> host: bob, same question. >> guest: right. it was a big year for dead presidents. caro's, the fourth of probably five volumes on lyndon johnson, just an incredible act of both reporting and writing about a general figure in 20th century american history. also, goodwin's book "team of rivals," published in 2005 is back on the best seller list thanks to steven spielberg's movie, "lincoln," and on our list, it's number 20, remarkable for a serious book that's been out for so long. also, john's biography of thomas jefferson. just when you think there's no more to be said, someone writes a popular, read readable, somewhat controversial book. >> host: hard to mention dead presidents and not mention "killing lincoln" and "killing kennedy" both best sellers. >> guest: bill and his writing partner, martin. i introduced bill about his process. o'riley says the partner does the research, and he does the writing. he has the idea to write history like a thriller, not in an academicceps. you have to trust him wher
on the fateful history which bob is so well chronicled. tom was previously with mortgage guaranty insurance corporation, asset-backed capital research, and wholesale access research and consultancy firm. tom issued early warnings of the increasing risk at fannie mae, about which he was correct, and, of course, ignored. our second discussing, ed pinto is a former executive vice president and chief credit officer of fannie mae, so he's lived in part of his history. as an aei fellow ed has considered groundbreaking research on the contributions of government housing policy for the mortgage crisis. two of his key research papers were submitted to the financial crisis inquiry commission. he is now developing policy considerations, options including countercyclical mortgage policies, an improved understanding of real estate values with appraisals as steps for rebuilding the housing sector. tom, you are first and we're looking forward to your comments. >> good evening. it's a pleasure to be with all of you. my thanks to alex and ed and aei for sponsoring this forum. it's a pleasure to see bob agai
and which bob hagerty will autograph after the program. i am the president fellow at a e. i. and we are pleased to have you with us to consider this fateful history and its role in american politicized housing finance. after many years of dealing with and thinking about fannie mae i thought i knew a lot about this subject but i learned a lot more about it from reading bob's book, especially the very long-term evolution of politicized mortgage finance in this country and also about the vivid personalities involved over the last 40 years, all the way to the end of the story, at least it is the end so far. the book is full of information but in addition if you read my invitation to this event you know i think it represents an underlying tragic drama. in fact a shakespearean tragedy in five's. rise, power, hubris, fall, and other humiliation. on power, many people in washington not so long ago and in the mortgage business everywhere in the country were truly afraid of fannie mae and the retribution it needed out to people who dared to cross it. on hubris, fannie often claiming it was th
marketplace, bob minzesheimer is the book reviewer and reporter for "usa today". sarah weinman, let's start with you. give us your general assessment of 2012 for the book industry especially when a comes to nonfiction books and what are one or two nonfiction books you want to talk about? >> let me start by saying 2012 was a very eventful year in the book publishing world between publishers consolidating the department of justice, doing five publishers and apple on e-book pricing and later into the program, amazon expanding its publishing operations, the google settlement moving forward in different directions. those alone account for a substantial portion of publishing news. on the non-fiction side it was a very strong year. in particular we are seeing a lot of best of 2012 lists dominated by behind the beautiful forevers which was winner of the national book awards. we had robert caro's latest volume in his ongoing biography of lyndon johnson and andrew sullivan's are from the free which was recently published. >> host: hundred page compendium looking at different child-rearing examples of
, none more so than "my american revolution." until i read bob's book i thought i was reasonably conversant for a college graduate of 40 years ago about the american revolution. from what we all know and most massachusetts virginia and the carolinas. in which the heroic continental army barely survived the winter in valley forge pennsylvania. one after the other, bob demolishes these myths and gives a new war centered around lawrence county new jersey aunts -- yes, you heard me right. the mountains 80% of which was fought on a terrain of the empire state-building. truth be told however, as well as admiration i have a grievance with bob. both irish and brightest we both have grievances. i've been hurting deeply disappointed on a personal level that one of bob's books. five years ago in the fall of 2007 i reviewed howe to get rich, the common room magazine and i praised it as quote a profoundly funny book. a year later in the fall of 2008 in the midst of an act of collective subtlety in which the wall street dragged america and the world economy under their funeral pyre i realize s
into this further because i i think this is on c-span and i am still friends with bob. but i was paid an average i think my take-home pay for two weeks was $350 for two weeks. i live with two elderly ladies on george mason drive in arlington, virginia. i had nothing. whenever anybody complains when they're young and they complain about trying to find a job, i go, try living with two old ladies on george mason drive in arlington, virginia. try it. then they invited their older sister to live with them. so there were three. anyway, apparently ronald reagan twice a year goes to people's houses to have dinner. chose to go to my boss' house. so i ago, what do you need quick so of course i'm mowing the lawn and washing the windows. i'm hoping that over time undoing all of this stuff sooner or later he was a greg, you can stick around and meet the president. and sooner or later like days and days of preparation, that's what happened and he asked me. the high point, a couple of high point to meeting ronald reagan. one of them was when the dog sniffing bob's came in and urinated on my boss' briefcase. [lau
this country in an exceptional way. his famous bob dole and in russell, kansas who served in world war ii, was severely disabled, came home uncertain of their future but dedicated his life to public service. i don't know how many weeks to months or years i looked in bob dole's life, but he think the passage of this convention i on disabilities to place's work at the moment. we owe it to bob dole, two of the disabled him who stand with locked arms taking us to pass this convention. we ought to disabled people across america and around the world to stand up once again for the race of the disabled and for expanding opportunity. not just in america, but across the world. people say we are an exceptional nation. there's a little bit of egotism in that statement, but i believe it is. i ask for additional 30 seconds. i believe it is factual and america is an exceptional nation that said sorting the believe that freedom and liberty and opportunity should be for everyone within our country and around the world. today is our chance. let no minor argument over some minor political issues from focusi
commanded our respect in a remarkable way. part of it was because of his service in the war. he and bob dole, our former colleague, literally were wounded at about the same time in europe and were in the same hospital recovering from tremendously serious wounds. senator inouye, of course, later was awarded the congressional medal of honor for that. senator pryor was telling the story that when senator inouye was finally elected to congress he wrote senator dole a note and said, "i'm here. where are you?" because both of them, when they were recovering from their war wounds, had determined that one day they wanted to serve in the united states congress. inouye got here first. a few years ago senator inouye and senator ted stevens invited a number of us to go with them to china. it was quite an experience. senator stevens -- of course, another world war ii veteran -- had flown the first cargo play plane into what was then peking in 1974. and senator inouye was well-regarded in china for that service. and so the group of norse -- there must have been -- and so the group of norse -- ther of se m
, one bob dole. second lieutenant bob dole of kansas. and there began a friendship that lasted to this day. both gravely wounded, both dedicated more than ever to serve their country. both served with distinction. and the friendship, the bonds of friendship that were forged in that hospital between bob dole and dan inouye were unique and enduring. so dan inouye returned back to his beloved hawaii, and the story goes -- and i don't know if it's true or not. the story goes that dan inouye went down to join the veterans organization, and when he applied for membership he was told that the only members they took in that organization were caucasian. dan inouye decided that he wanted to continue to serve his country in the state of hawaii. he was the first united states senator from the state of hawaii and served longer than any senator in this institution. he was loved by all of us. i didn't always agree with dan. occasionally we had differences about how we use appropriations bills. but no one -- no one -- ever, ever accused dan inouye of partisanship or unfairness. he loved native
] let me ask you, would we have a holocaust with the fault -- really? i wonder. the aforementioned bob said this was in an interview with me a few years ago that in the academy there's a feeling of don't let's be too rude to stalin. he was a bad guy, yes, but the americans were bad guys too and so was the british empire. eric die the, and apologist for communism and stalin. bob, who told the truth about the soviet union won a degree from a university run by, a sadly corrupt president, i believe, who admired bob. that says something about academia and the world. did you see the poster the e.u.? showing all the symbols of europe? it showed a cross, star of david, crescent and so on, and a hammer and cycle. there was a bit -- there's an outcry from the lit wanians, and why aren't we in the west sympathetic enough to the sufferers, the persecutors under communism to subject ourselves? why leave it to these? but there it was. i'm fairly relaxed about the communism symbols. you see a guy with a cccp sweatshirt and his trinkets. i did a study of this, a simple magazine piece, and, you know, t
the individual agent bernie bob person entity deciding on their own. there is court oversight. court oversight in the fact the warrants are issued by a court. it is independent oversight, judicial oversight of the entity. what the amendments to this change to presumption of delay to a presumption of notification by saying for law enforcement, investigative law-enforcement within 10 days disclosure must be made unless a court order is applied for a 90 day increments, were disclosure notification is delayed. the concern very slight change some pain that has worked very well to this point, has protected the public, protected the integrity of the investigations would be snowed demonstrated violation on the part of law-enforcement in many roles in regulation. granik, epca should be updated. with the advent of cloud computing and how we act culturally in terms of how we live our lives, e-mail and facebook the law should be looked at and updated. unfortunately, a lot of what has been proposed for change at this point is not to the advantage of law-enforcement investigations, but to their detriment. >
. bob kill brew told me, tom, you need to learn more about george marshall, so off i went. a couple years later i emerged from the archives. really came to admire the guy. i don't think he's a particularly likable guy. and the other hero, i think, in my book is eisenhower. i think he's actually underrated. the job of managing the allies, of dealing with the british, the french -- >> montgomery was no easy character. >> montgomery's a piece of work. [laughter] you know, at one point they're meeting -- montgomery won't come see marshall, so september 10, 1944 -- i mean, sorry, montgomery won't meet ike. so ike knews up to brussels. he can't get off the plane because he's wrenched his knee, so montgomery comes to see him. pulls out some memorandum can, well, they're sheer rubbish. eventually eisenhower says, steady there, monty, i'm your boss. it's fascinating to me how that difficult relationship with the british as they're realizing that we are replacing them not only in the combat effectiveness, but as a superpower, um, how eisenhower kind of lets them down'sly, manages that -- easi
and bob dole, our former colleague, literally were wounded at about the same time in europe and were in the same hospital recovering from tremendously serious wounds. senator inouye of course was awarded the congressional medal of honor for that. senator pryor was telling a story that's when senator inouye was finally elected to congress he rode senator dole aide notes that said, i am here. where are you? because both of them when they were recovering from their war wounds had determined that one day they wanted to serve in the united states congress and inouye got here first. a few years ago, senator inouye and senator ted stevens invited a number of us to go with them to china. it was quite an experience. senator stevens, of course another world war ii veteran, had flown the first cargo plane into what was then the king in 1944 and of course senator inouye was well regarded in china for that service. so the group of senators, there must have been a dozen of us from both parties, got more time with mr. hu and mr. wu the one and two leaders of china than almost the present of the uni
sarah weinman of "publishers marketplace" and bob minzesheimer of "usa today," we appreciate your time today on booktv. .. >> for complete scheduled visit booktv.org. >> co-founder of freedom fest, one of the largest libertarian conferences in the u.s. talked to book tv about the fast and his book "the making of modern economics." this is about 20 minutes. >> you're watching book tv on c-span2. we are on location in las vegas. in annual event organized by this author, mark stousen. tell us to a first of all, what is free of dust and how did talk about? >> a little bit about everything. our renaissance gathering. we have a little bit of everything for everybody. we did a very wide group. we even have an investment conference. wealthy investors, concerned citizens. the focus on political and economic and financial freedom and a strong. we're beer every year with over 2,000 people at this event. ruling. next year will be moving to caesars palace. ethier next year will be, are we round? unthinkable be a good controversial topic. >> sponsored by the libertarian party? >> i hate labels.
that on april 21, 1945, and i had the privilege of being with them, we stopped and went, we were with bob dole as well. ian bob dole -- literally as the crow flies, i think about two miles from one another, same time, same day, both mortally wounded fighting for their country. just above the bridges above tuscany. but because of detainees sense of honor, really think i can describe it to, when you hear the story, when you look at the record, his loyalty first and foremost to his you know, to the men he swore he would protect, he would do everything in his power to protect them. this is a man who kept fighting on the bridge even after his arm was severed. prime get out of that hand, to get to the next machine gun nest, taking it out in the process. saving his men. a man who was awarded the medal of honor for his incredible bravery, but he didn't do it because he was brave. he did it he does he was loyal. he did it because of his sense of duty your he did it because this was his country. they could've been talking about danny when he said, when it defies fear, when duty throws the gauntlet down
last point because my mind is on -- of course to say we need to learn about bob and these guys, locke's second treatise of government comes out of -- who argues for monarchy. and monarchy is looking better and better in the middle east. if there's one country that seems to have figured it out, so far, is morocco. and maybe that should be a model for other places in the region as well. >> thank you, bret. brian. >> my basic arguments for our side of the debate, an argument for reality of opening your eyes and seeing where we are today, two years into these uprisings and these changes. and in a region of the world just narrowly focused on the middle east which has about 20 countries, you have seen political change at least the leadership in four of them. in two of those countries we've seen islamist forces come to power through the ballot box. in the two others, islamist political parties are playing some sort of role, more marginal in libya. we are at the start of the process, and i think our response from washington has been very sort of philosophical and intellectual but not very ope
a model and an actress and -- i like to do that. my other one that i enjoyed the most was the bob crane story which became a movie autofocus and i went to the nevada desert. i try to keep my word with people, i will quote you write, i take everything. i went back with a suitcase, i had to buy the ticket, it was so heavy, this was a guy who had been murdered. we got a new trial after 17 years, new evidence, it worked extremely well. a fabulous movie. zodiac is on masterpiece and this one started great, william devoe, incredible job and they'll use a portion of my book but i thought i'm the luckiest guy in the world, i do love movies and we got an option for this new book. i can see that. big screen, the city in flames, an incredible felon. i call him the light keeper. i got this idea because back when i was working at the stock room we had a guy coming, must have been 90 and got his picture taken and he was a sea captain and i thought myself he is really nailed it. i was not sure what i wanted to do and i thought look at him. you can feel the salt and everything and i thought that is wha
. >> host: david rothkopf is our guest. bob in marina, california is the next caller. >> it is an honor to talk to you. i met you and some years back at the conference in monterey, california and i remember the educational challenges not only to reach the masses but also to educator the children of the superrich and that the blacks on route nadir at observation the only the superrich can save us. i would like to get an update on your take of the educational challenge we face by your analysis which i think is absolutely superb. you are really a beacon of light in the darkness for us all. >> host: >> guest: education is our biggest challenge, drive economic growth and we have an educational system that works on a model developed at the university of bologna in the year 800 where a guy stands in front of a rule of 800 and talk with them. and into every classroom using video and the internet. we need to recognize and education assistance designed for an agrarian era and give kids the summer of doesn't make sense and an educational system designed for people having one career in their lives
. beginning with bob allison from esa chair of the history department at the university just on this tree. yes it teaches at harvard extension school in a suffered several books on the american revolution, most recently a 2011 book entitled the american revolution, a concise history. he is the vice president of the cornell society massachusetts, trustee of the uss comes to touche museum also in the freedom trail and the commonwealth to see them in boston. he also serves the bostonian society as a member of our board's advisory committee. so with that, bob alice in. [applause] >> next we'll move to jon kyl. john does a curator of the book lost in 1775 from a site dedicated to history, analysis and unabashed gossett asserted the american revolution inkling. recently completed a study in general washington during the siege of the national park service. he saw soviet about doing good count watchman at the boston massacre, the way the encrypt these in 1765 in the towns celebration. ask them about the crazy event annually. he has lectured on many historical societies, including this one. thought --
the vote we had a wonderful ceremony in the dirksen building honoring bob dole. you see, yesterday was the international disability rights day. international disability rights day yesterday. so they wanted to honor bob dole for all he'd done, and it was a wonderful event, wonderful. i saw people over there honoring bob dole for all the work he he'd done on disability rights who voted against the bill today. i saw them, i thought wait a minute, since they're going to honor all the work bob dole had done on disability and bob dole was one of the strongest supporters of the crpd as it's called, came over here today in his wheelchair with his wife, former senator elizabeth dole. and yet -- and yet people voted against it. i don't get it. veterans. mr. president, there was a young veteran sitting in the gallery today and i met him yesterday the first time, senator kerry spoke at length about him, his name is dan brzezinski and i'm going to ask consent to put his op-ed in the record at the conclusion of my speech. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. harkin: as i also want to pu
to the senator about that. first, we have the amazing treat of bob woodward who has a fantastic book out on the last grand bargain negotiations is going to be joining us in just a second. first, welcome, all the people out in live stream land. we'll be taking your questions on hash tag "politico" breakfast. tweet us, welcome to the others watching. appreciative to the bank of america for making these conversations possible. we had a great partnership this year, including conventions, election night, and so we're very, very excited to be ail to bring these substantive conversations about the most important issues driving washington to you, thanks to the bank of america. thank you, john, and thank you to your colleagues. you may have gotten cards. we'll be bringing you into the conversation, think about what you're going to ask. without further adieu, we'll bring in bob woodward. mr. woodward? [applause] >> thank you. saving seats with my notes. i'll pick those up. >> which is your chair? >> you get the daddy chair. >> okay, thank you, thank you. >> so the price of politics, which has beco
is unaccountable, saturday night at 10:00 eastern on "after words" on c-span2. >>> pennsylvania senator bob casey on syria's civil war. he spoke along with incoming house foreign affairs committee chair ed royce on iran's nuclear program. the foundation for defense of democracies hosted this event. >> welcome. welcome again to the foundation for the defense of democracies annual washington forum. my name is mark argosh and i'm a proud supporter of fdd. it brings me great pleasure to introduce another senior official doing great work on capitol hill. congressman ed royce currently chairs the subcommittee on terrorism, nonproliferation and trade. last week he was selected to be the next chairman of the house foreign affairs committee. congratulations, congressman, on this new and important role. [applause] >> thanks, mark, thank you very much. >> it's no surprise that congressman royce has been entrusted by his colleagues with the committee's gavel have. he stands consistently at the forefront at the fight against global terrorist groups that threaten the united states including al qaeda. in his un
captures the human spirit. >> journalist and author bob woodward had an interview with blood it goes white house correspondent, mike allen. mr. woodward's latest book is the price of politics about a 2011 deathdealing negotiations in washington. mike allen also interviews marco rubio. they discuss the budget and taxes in the future of the republican party. this is just over an hour. [applause] >> good morning. welcome to playbook breakfast. thank you for coming out so early. we are excited to have an amazing doubleheader today. we are going to talk to senator rubio last night gave one of the first formal speeches to the head to the future of the republican party. we'll talk to senator rubio about that. next we have bob woodward who has a fantastic book out on the last grand bargain negotiations is going to be in just a second. first, welcome to people in lifestream land. will be taking your questions on hash tag political practice. welcome c-span, welcome others who are watching. we're appreciative to the bank of america for making these conversations possible. we had a great partnership t
's not even bob dole's treaty, although he certainly is a person who has been deeply involved. the vote on the treaty is the right thing to do on its merits. i think that it's important to note that every major veterans' group -- madam president, i ask that the list of the veterans' groups in support be included in the record at this time. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. mccain: i've not forgotten that 36 republicans signed a letter opposing consideration of any treaty during the lame duck, but there's no reason why we shouldn't have a vote on this. the letter says that they would oppose consideration, but we did have the motion to proceed. some may be worried about passing a treaty in a lame-duck session. the argument has no basis in the constitution or the senate practice. since the 1970's alone the senate has approved treaties during lame-duck sessions a total of 19 times. there's nothing special or different about lame-duck sessions. i'd like to address a few of the misconceptions about the treaty that i keep hearing. it's true that the treaty establishes a committee,
to him? >> oh, i've never been invited, so i don't know. [laughter] you're right, somebody there was. bob care row, i -- caro, i think. we look a lot alike. [laughter] as i like to say to bob, my guys all died really a long time ago. [laughter] it's a great question. joety cantor, the i think, has been writing on this in the times, and i think -- what i've heard about the obama dinners is, like all presidents, you know, you get behind that desk which is an unparalleled experience. as president kennedy said to david herbert donald one day, the great historian, donald comes in, there's been one of those rankings of presidents come out. kennedy didn't like it, and he said no one -- he pointed at his desk -- he said no one has a right to judge nip, even poor james buchanan who hasn't sat at that desk and seen what he's seen and dealt with what he's dealt with. [laughter] so, and i think there's a lot to that. on the louisiana purchase, the louisiana purchase led to the first really sustained secession thinking and movement in american history which was new england, because new england saw the
the board of bob jones university in 1950. he does it to win votes. bob jones had just moved, just moved his university and thurmond needed votes in south carolina. had lost in 1950 race for the senate to johnson, larger on the strength of votes he didn't win in the up country. that began a long process, a long relationship of thurmond with conservatives fundamentalists and evangelicals who are looking to get involved in the political process. so we need to understand thurmond's racial politics in the mix of these other conservative causes, these conservative issues that he was very involved in. and to see how they intersect with one another. and i think doing so gives us the history of what strom thurmond's america looks like, and else is rethink not only was going on in the south but was going on in the national conservative political realm as well. rethink and strom thurmond helps us think modern conservatism to a history i think that is too often thurmond is left out of because we only remember him as this kind of cartoonish racist figure from the deep south. let me read you, an excerpt
and bob dole never had a child and she said we never had children. i really can't answer. it was kind of an abstract question. the next day the media said she isn't really ready for the campaign trail because she isn't talking like a candidate in the personal and all of a sudden within three weeks, the campaign had kind of folded. i think michael dukakis's problems in terms of the presidential debate when he was asked about what he would do when his wife was raped and he had a very loyal kind of answer, a defense of the opposition to capital punishment in all the sudden we said it does he have a human side. we see into the capabilities and into the character of the individuals. i can get all or was first in the years not just because of the one he sent but because of him being played out out as a serial exaggerate your -- exaggerate her. he never said he invented the internet. he said he helped create with the perception of him being in a laboratory setting on the computer and during that. he was very important and became the international legislation, but he had that story, then he h
in michigan, one of the fellows i met there was bob dole, and we became good friends, even to this day. and when i asked him, what are your plans, and he, without hesitating said, i'm going to be a county clerk. after that, i'm going to run for the state house. of course, first opening in congress, that's where i'm going. i figure that's a good idea. so i went to law school. i became assistant prosecutor. when the territorial office became available, i ran for that office. and when stated came along, i got to congress. a little ahead of bob. >> you were in the territorial legislature then before you became -- >> two terms in the house and part of a term in senate spent and then came here as a member of the house. and who did you come here with at that time? >> the house had one member. >> you mentioned senator dole, and the fact that you had been in the hospital with him in michigan. it's amazing that some of these friendships were formed long before any public service, norma minetta talks about being a friend of, excuse me, the sender from wyoming, al simpson, and meeting him when he
, he said. i met jim webb in my office not far from here. as a result of senator bob kerry asking me if i would spend some time with him, i was happy to do so, i'll never forget that meeting, just the three of us in the room. for those of us who have worked with bob kerrey, he was such -- he is and was such a vibrant person. it's almost mischievous, i guess is the way to put it. you could just tell how he had just a little touch of differentness. and when he brought him in to visit with me, i learned very quickly they were both warriors. bob kerrey, a navy seal, recipient of the medal of honor, and jim webb, as we've said, navy cross, two silver stars, two bronze stars. both veterans of the vietnam war. as we sat talking, it was obvious that they were both fighters, warriors, and jim certainly proved that in his 2006 campaign. the reason bob wanted me to visit with him is because jim webb had decided he wanted to run for senate. what did i think of it? well, i probably told jim what a lot of people told him -- you want to run for the senate? the election's right upon us. no, he said,
that is being managed by the real bob sullivan. the genius on the other side of the hudson. let's welcome bob sullivan. >> so, let's cut to the chase. everything san know everything there is to know. >> i am thinking of all the result is ino, and most of them he knew first. there are a lot of our solvents. it might not be me here tonight. thank you so much. we should stop right there. i'm so happy. and also -- >> that's fine. i can read from your book. >> it would be a better night. i know that it would be a better night. when i write books it is how long can you put off not writing the book. i won't write down one. and then a couple of books or ideas keep coming back. there are a lot of them, but i couldn't beat it down. the air about the war. it's foggy. the other project that turns out to be one of my big projects or something is just to look around at the city and look at the landscape. this is a boring work, but to look up where we are. and so to go back to the strategy of the land. >> and serious. the book is an absolute revelation. i thought i knew about the american revolution. to dis
, the 63rd annual. [inaudible conversations] >> now joining us here is bob minzesheimer. i'm going to get you over here. you have the better light. i don't need to worry about that. how important are the national book awards in your view? >> well in the book world? very important. probably not quite as important as the pulitzers, but they're second to the pulitzer's, the most prestigious award, and they're trying to make them more of a cultural phenomenon. look the booker award thursday britain. >> do you comment on the finalists? >> well, i did -- i've always believed -- this is a strange thing. in britain, the bookies -- betting is legal in britain, and bookize set odd on the booker awards. we have nothing like that. and i thought, we should. try to make books more part of the popular culture. so my two predictions -- and i'm guessing because the judges or five people. each panel is five judges. five predictions that kevin powers, who has written a debut novel set in iraq, yellow bird, will be an upset in fiction, and an sold standby, robert caro, who has been on chance many tames, his
a lot of time in this room as well when i worked at cbo, but if bob is happy to be up here, i used to sit behind him and wait for him to turn around and ask me a question which he never did because he knew everything. i want to associate myself with three points that have been made, and just make a quick couple additional appointments. the first is i want to agree with every single word that has been said about george hw bush's leadership in 1990. i mean, i actually think that this is, you know, sort of the unsung story of our effort to get deficits under control, but i guess i want to broaden that to say that i think presidential leadership is absolutely important. i do not think congress as an institution is very well positioned to lead an effort involved inflicting pain on people. i think they need to go with someone, and whether it's two parties in congress or the president, that's important. it helps to be a second term president and not a first term president. i think they have more than what president bush could exercise that leadership, and i hope that he does so. i don't t
, i'd like to ask you the same question that bob asked the two candidates last night which is it snuck by most people. what about a no-fly zone in syria? there's military differences, russian, imported anti-aircraft, so sophisticated things, but the answer that boast romney and obama gave was, no, no military involvement. no-fly zone is a step towards military environment, but not a full military environment. what's your -- way would be your answer to that question? >> well, frankly, i think that the, you know, this is some of the calculation that went into the intervention in libya was if we intervened in syria, we already have done this. that's too flipped, but that's what one -- personally, i, you know, if in that position, i would be in favor of the no-fly zone. i think that -- so would the turks. they are saying, look, you're repeating history over and over here again. >> [inaudible] >> what i think is problematic is offering -- is sending, you know, certain caliber weapons to opposition which we don't know who they are, and that's also repeating a bad precedent. you don't want th
that we need a dialogue and much of the time whether it is bob costas getting in trouble or the doctors in florida told they can't talk about it or the military saying they can't talk about it or people just going hysterical we need to deal with this issue because it's important. >> guest: i hope we will but so far -- >> host: i've always felt the gun control side that we want to talk and maybe the other side doesn't but i'm willing to try anything to get to this table. thank you for writing the book and hopefully we can get the word out and get some sense -- good to talk to you. that was "after words" book tv signature program - which authors of the latest nonfiction books are interviewed by journalists, public policy makers, legislators and others familiar with their material. "after words" airs every weekend on booktv, at 10 p.m. on saturday, 12 p.m. and 9 p.m. on sunday and 12 a.m. on monday. you can also watch "after words" on line. ago to booktv.org and click on "after words" and the booktv series and topics list on the upper right side of the page. >>> with a month left in 2012,
at it and speaking of coming back at it, we have a second bite of the apple for bob. >> we are familiar with statistics that the u.s. spends significantly more percentage of gnp on health care than any other developed country. we hear that continuously. what i was surprised to hear at a recent conference was exactly the reverse is true when it comes to social support spending for lower income groups for seniors and people with disabilities or things like this. which raises the question in my mind would it be better for us to rebalance our spending in this direction to provide better quality by providing support services that allow people to stay in their homes functioning well instead of institutionalizing them which is very expensive. >> we need to figure out how to spend more sensibly and efficiently in health care no matter what else happens because it makes no sense. we know it can be done in a smarter way. the question about how and how much kind of support structure is a very large one. i will say that most, not all, most of the people who are now institutionalized in long-term ca
of the success of an nato enforced u.s.-backed no-fly zone in libya , like to ask you this same question that bob asked the two kendis last night which was, it sort of struck by most people. what about a no-fly zone in syria? and there are military differences. russian imported anti aircraft sophisticated things, but the answer that both romney and obama gave was no. no military involvement. the no-fly zone is a stab toward military involvement, but not a full military environment. what would be your answer to a question? >> frankly, this is part -- some of the calculation that went into the intervention in libya was that if we intervene in the rea to libya they're already done this. it makes things -- that's a little bit too flippant. personally if i were in that position i would be in favor of a no-fly zone. i think so with the turks. look, you're doing the same thing. you are repeating history over and over again. and what i think is problematic is sending a certain caliber weapons top position which we don't know exactly who they are. that's also repeating a bad precedent. you don't want thos
of the time of its bob costas kidded tripler doctors in florida or the military saying they can't talk about it were people going hysterical, we need to do with this issue. >> guest: we do what i hope we will. so far so to come. >> host: i've always felt that the gun-control side who want to talk, but i want to try anything to get them to the table. thank you for writing the book and hopefully we can get the word out. >> guest: thank you for the discussion. >> dallas "after words" in which authors of the latest nonfiction books are interviewed by journalists, public policymakers, legislators and others familiar with material. "after words" airs every week and on booktv, 10:00 p.m. on saturday, 12:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. sunday at 12:00 a.m. on monday. you can also watch online. go to booktv.org and click on afterwards and mysterious and topics list only if the recited page. >> you don't always find many newspaper editors embracing investigative reporting. the point be seen over the years is not just economics. it's a discomfort investigative reporting causes in the newsroom because his troubled
that they were going to firewall is off the ticket. it was run by bob hannigan the national chairman who ran the st. louis machine that got chairman rehab acted in 1940 and ed pauly. at holly was the kolshorn yet oil millionaire who said i went into politics when i realize it was cheaper to elect a new congressman to buy the old one. he leaders going to get indicted for good reason. >> host: his name is on the -- >> guest: the build alien -- the pavilion, exact way. they decided they would try to surround roosevelt with all the people who were hostile to wallace if wallace is on the ticket. in 1941 when henry luce made his famous speech wrote his editorial saying the 20th century's going to be the ends century and the united states is going to dominate the world economically and military old and culturally coming made a famous speech. the 20th century should not be the american century, should be the century the common man so what we need is the worldwide people's revolution in the tradition of the french, the american, the latin american and the russian revolution and called for ending impe
] >> bob samuels -- this working? bob samuels from "the washington post." this is for admiral mullen. i think the proposals of the administration are to reduce the marine corps by 20,000 and the army by 80,000 from their peaks, and there is much speculation that further cuts in the pentagon budget would lead to additional cuts in the both the army and the marines. if the united states was put in the position where it had to occupy and protect the oil fields of the persian gulf for an extended period of time, say five, six years, are those forces adequate to do the job? >> one of the, one of the reasons i at least was able to get through the tour as chairman is try not to speculate too much on hypotheticals. the reductions in both the army and the marine corps have been in the budget now -- i think they're in the '13 budget, so basically they've been on the hill, the beginnings of them, they've been on the hill for the better part of a year, and they are reductions both the chiefs of those two services and the chairman all support. clearly -- and i did as well when i was chairman over a
are largely standing on the sideline here. bob's organization put out an excellent report last week people should look at my organization. usip data private study. right now u.s. policy, also civil society and others were sitting on the sidelines here or there was a desire among local forces including younger islamists who want to bring about changes in their political movement in for the large purse sitting on the sidelines here we need to do more. >> we need to move on to the q&a portion here. a few questions from the audience. if you have a question, research and peer to microphone circulating. 10 minutes before we begin to wrap a. >> my name is -- [inaudible] -- washington d.c. what's missing on discussions is the fact that islamists have nothing to offer except for sharia law and muslims are fed up with the sharia law. the other point is there's a new new generation of arabs that face the people. i wrote an article about this, who are very different than their fathers and grandfathers. which we should be focusing on. >> can make it to a question? >> -- something we should be focusing
heroic things during that war. and it also has the support of former senate majority leader bob dole, certainly a patriot. senator dole, a disabled veteran from world war ii, who led the fight to pass the treaty, was here yesterday urging republicans to support it. now, mr. president, think about that. robert dole, who was grievously injured in world war ii, spent more than two years in a hospital, he came to this senate floor, and the first speech he gave was on disabilities, and we needed to do something about it. he was here -- he led the fight to pass the treaty, urging republicans to support it. a few republicans greeted him as he was in his wheelchair here. they greeted this 89-year-old war hero, i repeat, patriot, who just last week was in walter reed hospital. then one by one, all but a handful of them voted against the treaty, ensuring its failure. but their professed reasons for opposing it had no basis in fact -- none. most republicans acknowledge that. some use an excuse, well, it is a lame duck. we shouldn't be doing it in a lame duck. i mean, wow ... and there's no just
spent on friday about an hour with bob kerrey. bob kerrey and i reflected back on his experience here in the senate and one memorable meeting that he and i had. and the purpose of that meeting was for bob kerrey to introduce me to the presiding officer. and it was a wonderful meeting because when the meeting finished -- i won't go into detail on everything i said but the presiding officer knows -- i came out of that meeting recognizing how what kindred spirits these two gallant warriors are and were. both having been highly decorated, one in the navy, the other a marine. one medal of honor, the other -- the presiding officer -- navy cross, silver star, more than one bronze star for valor, a number of purple hearts. as i said again, but i can't say it too much, what an honor and pleasure it has been to serve in this body with the senator from virginia, jim webb. i've learned so much about what difference a positive attitude will make. no better example of that is the new g.i. bill of rights. to think that a new senator, a brand-new senator would have the idea, the confidence that i can
what became got which is bob dole got and bush got running for the reelection. that is a fact. and unless we look at the california republican party finding the right individual is going to turn of the largest stake in the country sounds like a serious deep fundamental rethinking now. unfortunately i have been around for so long. i was there for the rebound after goldwater that took a total of four years and i was there for the rebound after watergate that took six years. i was there after george bush lost in '92 which took two years, and i was there after they lost the house and 06 which took four years. so he said to me and my strategically optimistic? sure. the world isn't going to be kind to obama. they will have plenty of mistakes. the challenge is not what they will do wrong. the challenge is whether we are prepared to slow down, think, have honest arguments and figure out what we need to do. if we do that, the country will be just fine. thank you very, very much. [applause] >> from albany new york we hear about the state mandated new york state reuters institute. the pr
't clear minded enough or clear eyed enough about the russians. bob gates also, who had moved over to deputy national security advisers. that little group kind of delayed the process for six months because the people in state were ready to progress with what had been achieved at the end of the second reagan administration. but it really delayed things. the person who turned that around who also deserves a great deal of credit was jim baker. jim baker did a great job putting together kind of an interagency management, and different players, and spent a good deal of time, would arrive in moscow with an entourage, with the negotiators, jim woolsey from csc, the relative assistant secretary, broke them into working groups and continue the process raws participated in, there was a delay. i don't think there were any problems as a result. >> just wanted to say james baker was named secretary of state the day after george bush was selected. within a week he met with regional assistant secretaries to understand their priorities. my priorities were opportunities and challenges to include ea
working for me, care are garland, bob vanhuevland, wally, my legislative director who was with me for more than 20 years, tom mar, jerry gaginas, we all fondly call "mom," because she cracks the whip and makes sure the trains run on time. mary naylor, also has been with me more than 20 years. my deputies there, john rider and joel friedman, who have done extraordinary work on behalf of the people of this country. stew nagerka, who is going to help me with charts today, my longtime communication communics director, and so many more. and most  of all to my family, my wife lucy, who has been my partner through all this, was my campaign manager when i first ran for the united states senate, my daughter jessie, who in in many ways has perhaps sacrificed the most because when you're in this job, you miss birthdays, you miss other important events. but she has been a great daughter, and she was here last night for our farewell party. and we had a lovely time. our son, ivan, and his wife kendra, who are in oregon where they have a small farm tawld tipping tree farm. we wish they could be here tod
of the time whether it's bob costas getting in trouble for talking about it or doctors in florida told they can't talk about are the military told they can't talk about it or people just going hysterical, we need to do -- deal with this issue. >> guest: i hope we will but so far -- >> host: again the gun control side we want to talk and maybe that their site doesn't but i'm willing to try anything to get them to the table. thank you for writing the book and hopefully we can get the word out. thank you for the discussiodiscussio n. >> guest: good to talk to you. >> that was supple and booktv's signature program in which authors of the latest nonfiction books are interviewed by journalists public year's legislatolegislato rs and others familiar with their material. after words airs every weekend at 10:00 p.m. on saturday, 12 and 9:00 p.m. on sunday -- though you can also watch on line. go to booktv.org incorporated click on supple and in the topics list on the upper right side of the page.
representing opposite parties ninteen the lifelong friendship. we can look to john mccain, bob kerrey, chuck hagel, john kerry who despite facing enormous as challenges of war upon returning home, took the lead to normalize relationships in vietnam in helping to heal a wounded nation. it's now our responsibility to uphold the legacy of those who have gone before us. as we in keeping with the mission of united states the united states naval academy assumed the highest responsibilities of command and citizenship in government. thank you very much. [applause] >> ladies and gentlemen we are going to make a quick transition in the front of the room to set up for the q&a. by showing a brief video. cue the video. [laughter] if you haven't noticed we have been having a little bit of technical difficulty here today. here we go. ladies and jones meant the video you're you are about to watch is a call to action. we encourage you to buy the book and join the cause. thank you very much. [applause] >> he 9/11. we are prepared to serve in uniform but were not sure how ,-com,-com ma responding to responding
and found a few off the record and one on the record, bob bennet, lieutenant to mitch mcconnell saying, yes, mitch told us all we're going it try to block everything we can, and if we cannot, throw sand in the works, as much as we can, and, of course, the process of filibustering, which requires the two days for the cloture motion to ripen, a lot of time on the floor as you go through the process, and then if you achieve cloture, allowing the 30 hours of the post cloture debate, and you can demand the full 30 hours, and you don't even have to debate becomes a very tempting tool to use to soak up an enormous amount of floor time because if you have an ambitious agenda as the majority, floor time becomes a very precious commodity, and it's that process, then, you know, you can point to examples of bills and nominations that ultimately pass unanimously that were taken through. in the case of bill's, in many instances, a motion, filibuster on the motion to proceed, which ended up with a cloture motion that passed overwhelmingly, but then another filibuster on the bill itself, and then we see fi
and talk to senators and found a few off the record and one on the record. bob bennett that was in the senate of mitch mcconnell and he said yes, mitch mcconnell said that we are going to try to block everything. we can't block it, we will throw as much sand in the works as we can. of course, the process of filibustering, which requires the two days for the cloture motion to rise, a lot of time on the floor, as we go through this process, and then if you achieve this cloture, allowing 30 hours of post-cloture debate, you can command a full 30 hours that you don't even have to debate. it becomes a very tempting tool to use -- four times become a precious commodity. it points to what passes unanimously that was taken through. in the case of bills, emotion, a filibuster on the motion to proceed. which ended up with a cloture motion that passed overwhelmingly. all designed to use up more floor time. that is the restoration of the majority. now we can get to the appropriation of the minority. in the fact is that we do have something that is a chicken and egg problem. we saw
been submitted to bob patrick and the veteran's history project at the library of congress. for years and years researchers can find the interviews and use the stories for the future projects. these men represent the less than 2 million world war ii veterans living today. men and women who fought across the world, to defend and protect not only our country from harm, but something much more fundamental. our freedom. freedom is the big ideal. it's used a lot used in washington, d.c. i sometimes wonder if it lost the potent sei. when joe was liberated. there was out pouk on the cot next to him. he died that soldier died the day after the liberation fobbing -- took place. the wall behind me reminds all that many paid the ultimate prize. those who made it home hugged their families, returned to work, and hardly ever talked about the war again. this me more yule allowed them to open and share the sometimes. sometimes for the first time ever. on the day he was liberated joe was asked about the experience and he said he learned two things. to pray at the nazi prison camp and every day is a b
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